Monk paddles rapidly away as fast as possible in his coracle to avoid the torch bearing pagans on the island with their wicker man.
The Scottish Word:

Barrie-on.

Naw naw, thanks for the cannie offer but ah’ll barrie oan.

It’s a fine lookin praitchin station ye want me tae try. But ah canni stop. Forgive me.

It’s aw richt, dinni fash yersel’s. Bide there.

Ah dinni mind paddlin Sax, eicht or ten miles in the dark tae the island wi the wee fail biggit kirk ah’m telt’s up the road.

It’s promised tae me ah’n a canni let them doon. Ye understand.

The Lord’s wull be deen. Cheerio.

Translation:

barrie-oan, barry-oan, barry-on: hurry onward with intent, flail forward, get on with it.

No no, thanks for the kind offer but I’ll hurry on.

It’s a fine looking preaching platform you want me to try. But I cannot stop. Forgive me.

It is all right do not concern yourselves. Stay there.

I don’t mind paddling six, eight or ten miles in the dark to the island with the little turf built church I am told is upstream here.

It’s promised to me and I cannot let them down. You understand.

The Lord’s will be done. Goodbye.

′barɪ ɑn
The Scottish Word: barrie on with its definition and its meaning illustrated and captioned with the word used in context in the Scots language and in English.

The Wicker Man.

I saw the Wicker Man when it first came out at an age when a young Britt Ekland dancing naked made an impression to say the least.

But apart from that I thought it was an excellent story of a pious straight laced Western Isles policeman investigating a disappearance who encounters an island full of cheery hedonistic pagans who are close mouthed but welcoming.

And who in the end cheerfully sacrifice that policeman locked inside a blazing Wicker Man construct much the same as in the illustration above. A film worth seeking out and watching.

It features Christopher Lee as the Lord of the Isle and master of ceremonies.

Lord of the Isles.

The Lord of the Isles was a major title in Scotland back in the day, ruler of the seas, predating even when Scotland was a Kingdom. Powerful title and Fiefdom back then. Now it’s just a name that Royalty nick to seem important.

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