Small Scottish unicorn looking like it is going to be a lot of trouble.
The Scottish Word:

Pauchle.

Dinni be fooled by her pauchliness.

Ah’ve seen her pit an ee oot richt through the centre o a monocle.

Ahn dangle lone bawbags from her horn. We’ve nae idea whaur the bodies are.

She’s a Shetland pony unicorn, the warst kind.

Translation:

pauchle, pochle: a small bundle, a small parcel.

Do not be fooled by her small appearance.

I have seen her put an eye out right through the centre of a monocle.

And dangle lone scrota from her horn. We have no idea where the bodies are.

She’s a Shetland pony unicorn. The worst kind.

ˈpɑxlɪnəs

The Scottish Unicorn.

The unicorn was first used on the Scottish Royal Coat of Arms by William I of Scotland in the 12th century.

Before the unification of Scotland and England the Scottish Royal Coat of Arms had two unicorns supporting a shield and the English Royal Coat of Arms had two lions supporting a shield.

When Scotland and England unified under the Scottish James VI of Scotland in 1603, and he became James I of England and Ireland, he replaced one of the English lions with the national animal of Scotland, the unicorn, to show that the countries were indeed united and equal. It’s what’s on the front of a British passport at this time of writing.

Scottish unicorn, flag and shield carved on wall at Edinburgh Castle.

Scottish unicorn, flag and shield carved on wall at Edinburgh Castle. Photo by Pierre André under the Creative Commons License.

There’s an interesting ‘Why is the unicorn Scotland’s national animal’ article here in the Scotsman based on the work of American historian Elyse Waters. I’ve not fact checked it – because – it’s about unicorns.

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