“Right. Are ye sure yer Chems for golems are perfect this time Asimov? I’m no wantin this thing gi’in me oni mair o this bane heidit tirraneese it gets up tae.”

Translated:

tirraneese:harass with overwork.

“Right. Are you sure your written controls for golems are perfect this time Asimov? I am not wanting this thing giving me any more bone headed harassment with overwork that it gets up to.”

See the key to the common ancient Golem language here

[tirraneese] spelled out in the phonetic alphabet.

Illustration Friday.
artificial.

Isaac Asimov wrote the three laws of robotics.

I really enjoyed his books where he explored how the robots acted out these laws.

Right down to imprisoning and enslaving mankind in a gilded cage.

Terry Pratchet uses golems to explore slavery, race relations and the legal rights of artificial life in his book Feet of Clay.

Because his books are funny and very entertaining we sometimes don’t get that they are also great essays on various states of the human condition and worth re-reading.

Asimov’s three laws (adapted).

A golem may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.

A golem must obey orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.

A golem must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

Robert J Sawyer puts it well here why Asimov’s laws are unlikely to be used.