Frosty Dog Walk.

The last few days have been even colder than previously. We’re at the same latitude as Fort McMurray in Alberta, Riga in Latvia, and Novgorod in Russia. But we have island benefits – which means permafrost is rare.

Grass covered in ice crystals on the dog walk.

Permafrost.

Permafrost does happen occasionally though. Years ago when I stayed in a remote cottage we went through a really hard spell of weather with four feet of snow. It stayed that way for a while. Our water supply was from a burn up the hill. The burn froze. Then it froze harder and deeper and froze up the underground supply pipe.

We were OK.  Despite the deep snow my remote cottage remained accessible throughout the bad weather. Our neighbour who worked on snow ploughs took his machine home each night and cleared the road as a byproduct.

Water Transporter.

So every day I transported containers of water from my work so that my flatmates and I were hydrated, fed and washed. But the underground pipe stayed frozen for weeks after the temperatures returned to normal.

My work colleagues were amazed when I was still transporting water to my cottage on what had become sunny warm spring days.

One of the farm roads available on my dog walk trails that are reached from my house.
One of the farm roads, frosted white, that I can use for the various permutations of routes in the area that I take the dog for walks.
Grass frosted white.
Everything was covered in frost crystals. On a nearby bridge they were around 5mm across, like raised fish scales all over the surface of the bridge hand-rails.
Broom stems with ice crystals.
This is broom covered in frost crystals and although it did not have flowers other specimens did. The flowers seem unaffected. I wonder what insects in this weather get any benefit.